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Attorney General Hunter Adds First-Degree Murder Charge to Tulsa Man Already Charged with Drug Related Offenses

Attorney General Hunter Adds First-Degree Murder Charge to Tulsa Man Already Charged with Drug Related Offenses

TULSA - Attorney General Mike Hunter’s office has added a first-degree murder charge to a Tulsa man after an investigation alleges the drugs he sold to a Perkins woman were the cause of her overdose death.

Noah Montague, 25, was previously arrested and charged with two counts of possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute and the unlawful use of a communication device to commit a felony.

After an investigation by the Tulsa Police Department, authorities allege Montague sold Jamie Bear, 29, the heroin that led to her overdose death on Sept. 10. A subsequent search of Montague’s vehicle and residence found a significant amount of heroin and other drug paraphernalia.

Attorney General Hunter reiterated his office’s long-standing commitment to holding individuals accountable who distribute illegal drugs.

“Drug dealers who make cruel and conscious decisions to push deadly drugs like heroin into our communities need to be held accountable.” Attorney General Hunter said. “We have no tolerance for Montague’s callous actions that ultimately took the life of another person. I hope family and friends of this woman find some solace in the fact that justice will be served. My sincerest gratitude goes to the law enforcement teams who collaborated on this case. It truly takes all of us to fight the scourge of illicit drugs.”

Assisting in the investigation and arrest were the Perkins Police Department, Tulsa Police Department and Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation.

Officials with the Perkins Police Department found Bear unresponsive in her apartment after an anonymous call recommended law enforcement perform a welfare check. Agents seized syringes and a substance that tested positive as heroin in the home.

Charging drug dealers with first degree murder became Oklahoma law in 1989 when now-Attorney General Hunter was serving in the Oklahoma House of Representatives. He successfully ran legislation making certain drug-related homicides eligible for the charge.

 To read the amended information and probable cause affidavit, click here.