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Attorney General Hunter, OBN Director Scully Showcase ODMAP Technology, Announce Hiring of 10 Compliance Officers for Opioid Diversion

Attorney General Hunter, OBN Director Scully Showcase ODMAP Technology, Announce Hiring of 10 Compliance Officers for Opioid Diversion

OBN providing free ODMAP training for first responders statewide

Attorney General Mike Hunter speaks during a news conference at OBN headquarters Friday to announce new initiatives to combat the opioid epidemic.

OKLAHOMA CITY - Attorney General Mike Hunter and Bureau of Narcotics (OBN) Director John Scully today showcased the newest technology the agency is utilizing to track overdoses across the state and urged first responders to sign up for a free training. 

The ODMAP is a free law enforcement application that allows first responders to track overdoses across the state in real time. The data is used by law enforcement, public safety and public health officials to track trends as to where overdoses are occurring and deploy the proper resources.

First responders who use the application are able to enter an overdose on the map in minutes. No personal identifying information on the victim is collected. The only information made available to first responders is the location, age, gender and if the overdose was fatal or non-fatal. The information is not available to the public.

The recommendation to utilize the technology came from the findings of the Oklahoma Commission on Opioid Abuse, which Attorney General Hunter created and chaired. Director Scully was a member of the commission and took the ODMAP initiative under the purview of his agency to implement and train first responders statewide.

“The ODMAP is a proactive response to the state’s ongoing overdose crisis, which is why its implementation was a top recommendation by the commission,” Attorney General Hunter said. “The data collected will be another valuable tool in combatting the ongoing battle against overdose deaths and addiction in our state. The real-time information will allow for an immediate response, while targeting hot-spot areas and shutting down criminal drug dealers.

“We must provide our law enforcement partners with the necessary resources to protect our families and loved ones. I applaud Director Scully and his agency for not only utilizing this technology, but dedicating resources to train first responders across the state to help save lives.”

Currently, eight agencies in Custer, Garvin and Le Flore Counties have been trained by the OBN and are using the ODMAP application. The agency’s goal is to have the technology available throughout the entire state by next summer.

“Another very important aspect of OBN’s efforts to combatting the current epidemic, is our continued participation with Attorney General Mike Hunter and the commission on opioid abuse,” Director Scully said. “The commission has brought many good practices and ideas to the forefront. It has allowed agencies and individuals alike to share ideas and work together for a common good. I applaud Attorney General Hunter and members of the commission for their dedication. I look forward to continuing to be a part of creative and achievable solutions that will have a positive impact on the great state of Oklahoma.”

Law enforcement agencies and first responders are encouraged to contact the OBN to schedule a training at (405) 522-8031.

Also announced Friday was the recent hiring of 10 new OBN compliance officers, who will investigate opioid diversion. The officers will also assist in the new oversight requirements for manufacturers, distributors and medical facility owners, per legislation created by the Oklahoma Commission on Opioid Abuse.

“Throughout the course of our meetings, the commission on opioid abuse focused heavily on how to prevent prescription pills from flooding the market,” Attorney General Hunter said. “These officers will help provide needed control, proper oversight and shut down pill mills, further protecting our loved ones from addiction and overdoses.”

Director Scully said the agents will be stationed at various locations throughout the state and will supplement existing resources targeting the opioid crisis.

“We are excited to add 10 new compliance agents to the ranks,” Director Scully said. “Each one of their backgrounds and experiences in investigating will serve them well in their new role as we seek more ways we can help curb this epidemic that has already taken too many Oklahomans.”

The annual 2018 OBN Drug Threat Assessment was also released on Friday. The annual assessment provides law enforcement officials, citizens and policy makers with an analysis of drug trends and criminal drug activities in the state. It aims to assist stakeholders when making decisions about policy changes and where to allocate resources.

To read the 2018 Oklahoma Drug Threat Assessment, visit the OBN website at https://www.ok.gov/obndd/.

OBN Director John Scully (right) introduces Attorney General Hunter to the new opioid diversion compliance officers.

The ODMAP is a free law enforcement application that allows first responders to track overdoses across the state in real time. The data is used by law enforcement, public safety and public health officials to track trends as to where overdoses are occurring and deploy the proper resources.